David Hunter

David Hunter

David Hunter is Professor of Law, Director of the International Legal Studies Program and Director of the Program on International and Comparative Environmental Law at American University’s Washington College of Law, where he researches and teaches international environmental and human rights law. Prof. Hunter was formerly Executive Director of the Center for International Environmental Law, an environmental consultant to the Czech and Slovak environmental ministries, Executive Director of WaterWatch of Oregon and an associate at the law firm of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. He has consulted on the development of environmental and social standards and associated accountability mechanisms at several international organizations, including the United Nations Development Programme, United Nations Environment Programme, the Adaptation Fund, the Asian Development Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation. He currently serves on the Boards of Directors of the Bank Information Center, the Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide-US, EarthRights International, and the Project on Government Oversight (chair). He is a 1983 graduate of the University of Michigan with a B.A. in economics and political science, and a 1986 graduate of the Harvard Law School. Mr. Hunter is author of many articles and books on international environmental law and associated topics and is a co-author of textbooks on International Environmental Law and Policy (Foundation Press) and Climate Change and the Law (Lexis Nexis Publishing).


Dean Emeritus Claudio Grossman

Dean Emeritus Claudio Grossman

Claudio Grossman is Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus of American University Washington College of Law (WCL) and the Raymond Geraldson Scholar for International and Humanitarian Law. He is the author of numerous publications regarding international law and human rights (see wcl.american.edu/dean/cv.cfm). In April 2008, Dean Grossman was elected Chair of the United Nations Committee against Torture, where he has been a member since 2003 and previously served as Vice Chair (2003-2008). He is also a member of the Commission for the Control of Interpol’s Files (since February 2005) as well as Chair of the Committee on International Cooperation of the Association of American Law Schools. Dean Grossman served as President of the College of the Americas (COLAM), an organization of colleges and universities in the Western Hemisphere, from November 2003-November 2007. He was also a member of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) from 1993-2001. He was twice elected its President, first in 1996 and again in 2001. He also served twice as the IACHR’s First Vice President (2000-2001, 1995-1996) and Second Vice President (1999-2000). He was the IACHR’s Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Women (1996-2000), Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Populations (2000-2001), and Observer of the AMIA Trial (2001-2005). Representing the IACHR, Dean Grossman participated in missions to Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay and Peru, among others. On behalf of international and non-governmental organizations, he has also chaired or participated in missions to observe elections in Nepal, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Romania, Surinam, and the Middle East.

He has also received numerous awards for his work with human rights and international law, including the René Cassin Award from B’nai B’rith International in Chile and the Harry LeRoy Jones Award from the Washington Foreign Law Society. In October 2000, Dean Grossman was named Outstanding Dean of the Year by the National Association of Public Interest Law (now known as Equal Justice Works). In addition, the Inter American Press Association named Dean Grossman as the recipient of the Chapultepec Grand Prize 2002 for his achievements in the field of human rights and his work and commitment to promoting and protecting the freedom of expression and of the press for all people. In 2007, Dean Grossman received the Simón Bolívar Award from the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation in recognition of his lifetime achievements in promoting human rights, and the Charles Norberg International Lawyer of the Year Award from the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Inter-American Bar Association. Dean Grossman is a member of numerous associations, including the Inter-American Institute for Human Rights, for which he is a member of the Board of Directors.


Diane Orentlicher

Diane Orentlicher

Diane Orentlicher is co-director, Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law; professor of international law. She holds expertise in Public international law; United Nations law; International Criminal Court and other war crimes tribunals. Orentlicher is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, American Society of International Law, and American Society for Political & Legal Philosophy. In addition, she is on the Board of Directors or Advisory Council of several organizations, including Open Society Justice Initiative of the Open Society Institute, and Coalition for International Justice as well as on the Advisory Council of Lawyers Committee for Human Rights and International Human Rights Law Group. In September 2004, UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan appointed Diane Orentlicher as an independent expert on combating impunity.


Herman Schwartz

Herman Schwartz

Professor Herman Schwartz has worked for human rights both in the United States and abroad for over four decades. He is currently advising numerous former Soviet bloc countries on constitutional and human rights reform; he has recently analyzed proposed revisions of the Armenian and Georgian constitutions. In February and March of 1994 and 1995, he was a member of the U.S. Delegation to the 50th and 51st Sessions of the UN Human Rights Commission, and in June, 1993, he was one of four public members of the U.S. Delegation to the UN World Human Rights Conference in Vienna. In 1983, he founded and now administers the US/Israel Civil Liberties Law program, which is designed to train and develop a human rights bar in Israel; in recent years the program has been expanded to include lawyers from Central and East Europe and has been replicated at Columbia University Law School with his assistance. In 1987, he organized and chaired a Human Rights Watch Committee project on prisons throughout the world and has personally visited and reported on prison conditions in East Europe and Latin America. He is a Co-Director of the Washington College of Law Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law, and a member of the boards of the Foundation for a Civil Society, Helsinki Watch, and other domestic and foreign public interest organizations.


Juan E. Méndez

Juan E. Méndez

Juan E. Méndez is currently the UN Special Rapporteur on Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment and is a Visiting Professor of Law at American University Washington College of Law. In 2009 and 2010, he was the Special Advisor on Crime Prevention to the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. He is also Co-Chair of the Human Rights Institute of the International Bar Association. Until May 2009, he was President of the International Center for Transnational Justice (ICTJ), and in the summer of 2009 he was a Scholar-in-Residence at the Ford Foundation in New York. Concurrent with his duties at ICTJ, the Honorable Kofi Annan named Mr. Méndez his Special Advisor on the Prevention of Genocide, a task he performed from 2004 to 2007.


Macarena Saez

Macarena Saez

Macarena Saez is the Faculty Director of the Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at American University Washington College of Law in Washington, DC. She is a Fellow in the International Legal Studies Program and teaches at WCL in the areas of Family Law, Comparative Law, and International Human Rights. Her main areas of research are gender discrimination in Latin America, and comparative family law. Professor Sáez is also the Faculty Director of WCL’s Impact Litigation Project. She is member of the Executive Committee of the Network of Latin American Scholars on Gender, Sexuality and LegalEducation ALAS, organization that provides trainings to law professors in Latin America on mainstreaming gender and sexuality perspectives in legal education. She is also member of Libertades Públicas, an organization that promotes civil liberties in Latin America. With this organization she was one of the lead counsels for the victims in the first case on sexual orientation before the Inter American System of Human Rights Atala and daughters v. Chile. Before coming to WCL Macarena Saez was a faculty member at the University of Chile Law School where she taught jurisprudence and worked actively in the law school’s curriculum reform. She has also taught feminist jurisprudence and human rights in different universities of Latin America and Europe.


Richard Wilson

Richard Wilson

The consistent focus of Professor Richard Wilson’s scholarly work has been the tension between the “haves” and the “have-nots” of the law, whether they are individuals, countries, or entire legal cultures. Professor Wilson seeks to improve access to justice by improving legal training of public interest advocates, including public interest and clinical offerings in law school curricula, opposition to the death penalty, developing models of legal representation of the poor, and effective use of international human rights law in domestic and international law. Professor Wilson is active in the development of legal aid, public defense, public interest NGOs and law school clinics throughout the world. He recently co-authored a report for the International Human Rights Law Group entitled Promoting Justice: A Practical Guide to Strategic Human Rights Lawyering (2001), which draws from regional meetings of human rights NGO lawyers from Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe and Latin America. Professor Wilson is also interested in new developments in the law, procedures and structures for providing appointed defense counsel in international war crimes trials and international criminal tribunals. He recently completed a book chapter on that subject, Will History Repeat Itself? Case Studies of Systemic Constraints on Defense Counsel in International War Crimes Trials and the Need for Resource Parity, in Effective Strategies for Protecting Human Rights: Economic Sanctions, Use of National Courts and International Fora, and Coercive Power (David Barnhizer, ed.).


Robert Goldman

Robert Goldman

Robert K. Goldman is Louis C. James Scholar; co-director, Center for Human Rights and Humanitarian Law; faculty director, the War Crimes Research Office; and professor of law. He holds expertise in international and human rights law; U.S. foreign policy; terrorism; and law of armed conflict. From 1996 to 2004 he was a member of the Organization of American States’ Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, and its president in 1999. From July 2004 to July 2005, Goldman was the UN Human Rights Commission’s Independent Expert on the protection of human rights and fundamental freedoms while countering terrorism. In October 2005, the International Commission of Jurists named him one of the eight jurists on the Eminent Jurists Panel on Terrorism, Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights. He is author of The Protection of Human Rights: Past, Present and Future (1972); coauthor of Middle East Watch’s book, Needless Deaths in the Gulf War, a 1991 publication that assessed civilian casualties during the 39-day air campaign and assigned responsibility for violations of the laws of war; and coauthor of The International Dimension of Human Rights: A Guide For Application in Domestic Law (2001). He is also the author of scores of reports, papers and articles on human rights and humanitarian law related issues.